Schools and parents are using Uber to get kids to school. What if there was a similar app for tutors?

An isolated community college in Massachusetts made national news when its president decided she had enough with students paying for Uber rides to get to class.

“Because we have such a significant number of middle-income and lower-income students, having public transportation makes the difference between coming to college or not.”

President Gentile is baffled by the idea that her students can get to the mall, but not to school, and she’s in good company.

“Students really are leaving because of seemingly non-academic reasons like transportation,” says Melinda Karp, Assistant Director of the Community College Research Center at Columbia University’s Teacher’s College.

“They’re balancing work and school, they’re balancing family, and they’re commuters,” but when colleges provide the kinds of support systems that can “make life feasible,” Karp says, students are more likely to stay in school.

Most students are lucky enough to have access to numerous bus stops, carpooling, bikes. But what happens when the options fail? When there’s inclement weather? If it’s late at night or on the weekend, there’s still an Uber driver on call to get you where you need to go.

Yup is no different.

With the right conditions, all the perfect scenarios of learning come into play when you introduce mobile tutoring to a student. A world-class educator can instantly be at your service – whenever you need it – without you having to leave your desk (or bed, or back seat of your car).

Mobile tutors are patient, and Yup tutors don’t just give you the answer; they find where your troubles are and break it down for you until you understand the concepts thoroughly. Right there in the chat screen.

If parents embraced this kind of learning supplement the same way they’ve taken to Uber, their kids could breeze through math homework instead of paying for long hourly tutoring expenses and hauling their kids to a central location for sessions.

When you get to college, making it to class or to a study session becomes increasingly difficult with a cozy dorm room and the fact that it’s 7 AM. Mobile 1-to-1 tutoring gives you the best kind of learning freedom: pajama freedom.

A cheesy early-2000’s one hit wonder song went like this:

A thousand miles seems pretty far
But they’ve got planes and trains and cars
I’d walk to you if I had no other way

The Plain White Tees weren’t talking about their cross-country lover Delilah. They were talking about the regular tutor they desperately needed before a final exam. Those were the flip-phone days.

Now you have the App Store. Let’s get learning.

Should you pull an all-nighter? Use this equation

We’ve all been there.

Somehow, through all the craziness of the quarter/semester/term, through the countless homework assignments, the tears and laughter, the events and study groups so carefully planned…

You realize you may have to stay up all night for school. As online math tutors, we’ve seen countless students log into the Yup app during a stressful all-nighter. Therefore, we’ve created a simple cost-benefit analysis formula that can help you decide whether or not to watch sunset and sunrise.

Before you decide to embark on this strange, twisted journey, plug in your own variables and see where the equation takes you:

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The Variables

t

‘t’ is the time you have until the assignment is due or the test is administered. If judgment day is happening in under 24 hours, then you might think you already have no choice but to pull one. However, there are other variables to consider here.

When you plug into the equation:

t = 1 if you have greater than 24 hours to prepare.

t = -1 when you have less than 24 hours.

W

This is the likelihood that you’ll reach your target grade by winging the whole thing. How comfortable are you with the material?

This is also a self-expectation variable. Obviously you want to turn in only your best work, but you have to consider factors such as: what other classes must you be awake for the next morning? Do you want to look like a wilted piece of spinach? Can you afford to take a lower grade and preserve your sanity?

W = 5 if you could half-study/half-watch Netflix and be fine.

W = -5 if you still have to remove the plastic wrapping from the textbook.

F

F is for Focus. To what extent will you need to use cognitive function the next day? If you deprive yourself of sleep, you risk losing key bits of memory you worked all night to fortify. Even your ability to operate a motor vehicle becomes impaired.

If you have a test to perform well on, F = 1

If it’s an assignment you can crash on and not think about the next day, F = 5

A

This variable determines whether or not you should pull the All-Nighter.

If A is 0, sorry, but you probably should work through the night.

If A is below 0, consider hitting the books hard but getting enough rest to function and perform in the morning.

Mind you, these are simply suggestions. We understand students have busy lives, but we still recommend preparing far ahead of the 24-hour window. You can cut down on the time by heading to app store and downloading Yup, so you can chat with a professional tutor whenever you need homework help.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘Thrivers’ vs. ‘Divers’: Why high school success doesn’t guarantee A’s in college

According to a recent blog by the Washington Post, high school grades may be the best predictor we have to foresee college success… but it’s still fairly useless.

The blog focuses on a study conducted by the University of Toronto, which found that incoming college freshmen, on average, predicted they’d score a 3.6 overall GPA after their first year. Pretty solid goal to hit, especially factoring all the social and academic adjustments. The average actual GPA for the first year? A sad 2.3.

So with all the high-scoring high school kids, why were their college GPAs so low? Sure, college courses are more challenging (as they should be), but that doesn’t paint the whole picture. A bunch of smart wonks got together and conducted a personality test on the students to find more answers:

They focused on two kinds of students. The “thrivers” were those who did much better in college than their high school grades would have predicted. The “divers” were those who did much worse. Mostly, these students were neither superstars in high school nor delinquents — they all got fairly good, respectable grades. But upon arriving at college, the thrivers averaged A’s, while the divers averaged F’s.

You can read the rest of the article here.

It turns out that intelligence really isn’t a large factor in determining success. As math tutors, we chat with all different kinds of students on the Yup app. We see the same common personality traits in the ‘thrivers’ and ‘divers’ from the study in our sessions.

Here are some strong habits to make (or break) in order to thrive in school:

Conscientiousness

Most students who took a dive described themselves are being less likely to be careful or thorough in their work. In school and in the professional world, this is a huge factor that perhaps isn’t obvious in a college application but becomes very clear in the work you turn in.

You can cultivate more conscientiousness by approaching assignments and studying as though you were the on reading it. For example, if you were in the teacher’s shoes, what would you think of the quality and time you put into your essay? Professors and TA’s in college have more time and resources to dissect your submissions, and therefore you must care more about the minute details. They say it’s impossible to teach someone how to care about something; so raise studying to the same standard you hold Harambe (RIP).

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Grit

Many psychologists and education gurus talk about this trait, and it’s not what you eat with shrimp.

Grit is how you respond to adversity. Do you thrive in uncomfortable situations, socially and academically? How creative are you with problems that don’t have a conventional solution?

For example, if you run into a problem with math homework and can’t get a hold of immediate assistance, look out for alternative resources to fix the problem. Yup connects you with live tutors via mobile app fpr help with math, physics or chemistry – whenever you need it.

Organization

Some K-12 teachers have pointed out a trend of students delegating more organizational duties to their parents and more recently, their own teachers.

Once these students get to college, the professors give out the syllabus on day one and that’s the last time they’ll notify for due dates; no extensions, check-ups or reminders. Students must learn quickly how to become their own secretaries.

Find what time management skills work best for you and prioritize accordingly. Nailing down a habit of planning your work ahead doesn’t require much brainpower once you get into a rhythm, yet can make all the difference in your end results.

 

 

 

 

Student Spotlight: Nick Elleman’s Explaining, Not Answering

Meet one of MathCrunch’s students:

Nick Elleman

Junior, Conner High School

Favorite subject? AP Chemistry;Least favorite? English.

Extracurriculars? I play lots of tennis. I practice every day!

Favorite App? Twitter. I love interacting with all my friends in a fast way!

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