New York high schooler uses tutoring app to crush exams

School can be daunting: juggling extracurricular activities, exams, strategizing the perfect time to text your crush… it’s amazing sleep gets factored in at all. We want to tell your stories. We occasionally feature students who have run into academic roadblocks and used the Yup app to connect with a tutor for math, chemistry and/or physics.

This week, we interviewed a high school student who connected with one of our mobile tutors to prepare for New York’s especially rigorous testing system.

Meet:

img_1973Gianna, 10th grade, New York

Favorite subject: Chemistry or English

Least favorite: Geometry

Extracurriculars: Soccer, acting, softball and/or baseball, and dancing.

Favorite app: Yup of course!

What kind of student would you describe yourself as?

I’m the type of student to try to do my work fast but also correct. Hoping to have a 95 average I try to study hard for quizzes and tests.

What’s the hardest part about high school?

The honors classes I’m in, and regents.

[Note: In New York State, Regents Examinations are statewide standardized examinations in core high school subjects required for a Regents Diploma to graduate. Most students, with some limited exceptions, are required to take the Regents Examinations. To graduate, students are required to have earned appropriate credits in a number of specific subjects by passing year-long or half-year courses, after which they must pass Regents examinations in some of the subject areas.]

What do you wish you’d have known freshman year?

I really should have known not to slack off.

What excites you about going to college?

College would be a life turning experience and make my dreams come true! I’m pursuing a career an acting, media and/or the film industry.

Any study tips? Life tips?

I really suggest using flashcards and asking your friends or family to help study! And don’t be afraid to make new friends in high school!

How’d you find Yup?

I found out about Yup on an ad and I was interested in getting better grades in a fun way!

Describe your experience with our tutoring. What was your previous tutoring experiences if any? Was the app easy to use? What was your tutor like? How did you work through the problem? How long did the whole thing take? Care to share an image of the problem(s) you worked on?

Previous tutoring experiences weren’t that easy. They didn’t make that much sense but since I used the app it was easy… the tutors were very nice and made the problems very easy. It depends on how long and difficult a problem is for them to work through it.

Usually it takes them 6-10 minutes depending on also the subject. In general Yup is a great app for new incoming freshman to get new subjects since middle to high school is a new jump. But I feel like it’s useful for any other grade!

What can Yup do better?

Yup is already a perfect app for my math needs, but I would love to see the tutors cover more subjects!

What is the future of education/technology?

The future of education and technology is gonna be enormous compared to what we have today! I’m excited to see what other ways we’ll find out innovative and fun ways to learn.

Oh, the places you shouldn’t go: 5 mistakes freshmen can avoid

Welcome to the big leagues, kid. As you walk the halls of the jungle that is high school, know that nap time’s over. You’ve got calculus to master! Proms to attend! Clubs to join and sports to play. With these landmarks come moments of crippling embarrassment, eye-opening lessons, and rare but incredible victories along the way. Oh, the places you’ll go. 

Four years down the road, you’ll look back and laugh at how monumental such insignificant moments seemed. But you’re living in a present reality that includes heckling in hallways and unjamming rusty lockers. You need help. Usually, we’re just here as tutors on your smartphone app helping you through math and science problems. But for the freshmen, we have an even higher calling.

We can help you foresee and maybe even cushion the blow some of the inevitable “freshman mistakes” that have earned you the most vulnerable spot on the high school totem pole.

All those who wander are probably lost

Whether it’s figuring out the temperature on a new shower faucet or navigating the hallways, one must always have a game plan when venturing into unchartered territory. If your strategy is to simply “wing it” between classes, think again.

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If you’re late to class, you risk getting off on the wrong foot with your math teacher. Worse yet, think of the one type of student most likely to be purposefully late on the first week of school: seniors. You’re lucky if you walk by a benevolent one; but just remember that they know the ins and outs of the building, so there’s no hiding.

Everybody love everybody

Herd mentality is a grim reality of life, which becomes pretty apparent when hordes of students shuffle to class at the sound of a bell. Therefore, you will realize that cliques do exist, and that people don’t always believe in embracing differences in others.

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Don’t automatically assume that social cliques are as cliché as in the movies – if you assume that everyone fits into a category of jock, nerd, or freak, then you’re missing out on a lot of potential connections. The most interesting kids I knew in high school didn’t care about what group you were in or project some stereotype onto others.

Respect the bus hierarchy

Unless you have the luxury of riding to school with a pal or older sibling, you must endure the plight of unlicensed minors across the nation: the school bus.

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Navigating the artificially-constructed seating chart of the bus can be confusing, but in a nutshell: seniority rules, from front to back. That means sitting on top of an overheating rear engine and cramping your awkward legs over the back wheel hump underneath.

You have four whole years!

We’re not here to sugar coat anything; freshman year really can suck at times. General education courses have the tendency to cause premature gray hairs. However, you should still try to cherish the freedom of being the new guy/girl. It’s important to learn what you can, while you can – before college applications and challenging courses take over your schedule.

Not making many friends? You have plenty of time to reach out. Your crush chose another someone? Freshmen go through relationships like juniors go through college apps: lots of crying, then on to the next one. You have time, so trust the process more and your hormones less! But on the other hand…

…You only have four years…

Before you know it, you’ll walk across a stage, shake your principal’s clammy hand, and walk off into the unknown sunset with a diploma. You’ll think back on these times now and wonder what could have been.

So don’t waste time. If you’re suffering in class, get help now. Scared to talk to the cutie in calculus? You’ll be scared tomorrow too, so might as well pony up today. So often, college freshmen talk about how miserable they were in high school compared to college. If you bring some of the same open-mindedness that college kids do now, your experience will be much more enjoyable.

Good luck, class of 2020!

Managing your child’s budget: Movie theater hacks, Money-saving apps, and more

Every day across the country, a student runs out of monthly mobile data. With a part-time job and/or full-time school on the schedule, the young adult must make a crucial decision: purchase more data or be able to afford more fro-yo this weekend?

These financial decisions seem insignificant to parents (who shoulder essential family expenses). But student activity on weekends can be boiled down to just a few predictable expenses, i.e. shopping, going to the movies, driving around with friends. Yes, just driving. The rising cost of these relatively cheap pastimes make life difficult for students who aren’t able to directly outsource these costs to their parents’ credit card.

Our schools aren’t exactly making life easier, either. Data shows that in 31 states, local government spending on schools fell even after the recession ended from 2008-2014. Adjusted for inflation, students are still getting duped out of funding.

While counties divert money away from schools, families have had to scrape harder to find alternative methods of tutoring, and in some cases, having the students find jobs to make ends meet.

However, students are evolving when it comes to making money and having fun. In the age of information and technological innovation, parents are also finding new ways to save money and track their youngsters’ spending habits. We might be a bunch of online math tutors, but that doesn’t mean we can’t show you a few more budget hacks we’ve picked up as poor millennials:

Continue reading

Tennis Player Serves Up Pre-Calc With MathCrunch

Each week we feature a student who has used MathCrunch to help with homework and other daily problem solving. Meet:

Alex

Junior, Kings High School

Favorite subject: AP American Government

Least favorite: Chemistry

Extracurriculars: Varsity tennis, Recycling Club, National Honors Society

Favorite App: The ESPN app

What kind of student would you describe yourself as? Continue reading

Tech as a middle-man: A young film director’s story

Each week we profile bright, resourceful students who have used EdTech for math homework help. Meet:

Ryan S.

Freshman, Ventura High School

Favorite subject: English

Least favorite subject: Physics

I’m an avid cyclist and cello player but my main focus the last year or so has been filmmaking.

Favorite app: My favorite/ most used app is without a doubt Pandora because no matter what I’m doing, I love having it on to offer a little bit of non-visual inspiration and stimulation.

What kind of student would you describe yourself as? Continue reading

Dodging Hallway PDA

We feature students from around the country who are using MathCrunch.

Meet:

Tye D.

El Comino Charter High School, 10th Grade

Favorite subject: English

Least favorite: Geometry

Extracurriculars? I will soon be taking piano lessons!

Favorite app: My favorite app would have to be Twitter, but if we’re talking academically, then of course MathCrunch (even though it only applies for math.)

What kind of student would you describe yourself as?

Continue reading

College Finals according to Gavin

Each week we feature people from around the country who have used MathCrunch. Meet:

 

Gavin

Freshman, Virginia Tech University

Favorite subject? Marketing.

Least favorite? Accounting.

Extracurriculars? I like to shoot hoops at the gym and I just joined an investment club at school.

Favorite app? Instagram.

What kind of student would you describe yourself as? Continue reading